6 Improve maternal health

Where we are?

 

Goal and Likelihood of achievement

  • Improve maternal health - Likely
    • Reduce maternal mortality by three quarters - Acheived
    • Acheive universal access to reproductive health - Likely

TARGET 5A. Reduce maternal mortality by three-quarters between 1990 and 2015.

Indicator

1990
2000
2005
2010
2013
2015 target
Maternal mortality ratio (per 100,000 live births) 850
415
281
229
170
213
Proportion of births attended by skilled birth attendant (%) 7
11
19
36
50
60
 
Sources:
UNDP (1992).
NPC (2002).
MoHP, New Era, & Macro International Inc. (2006).
Family Health Division (FHD) (2009).
World Health Organisation (WHO), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), & The World Bank (2012).
Nepal Family Health Programme (NFHP) (1995).
MoH, New Era & Macro International Inc. (2001).
MoHP, New Era & ICF International (2011).
FHD (2013).

 

TARGET 5B. Achieve universal access to reproductive health by 2015.

Indicator

1990
2000
2005
2010
2013
2015 target
Contraceptive prevalence rate (modern methods) (%) 24
35.4
44.2
-
43.2
67
Adolescent birth rate (births per 1,000 women aged
15-19 years)
n/a
110
98
n/a
81
70
Antenatal care coverage
At least one visit (%) n/a
48.5
73.7
89.9
85
100
At least four visits (%) n/a
14
29.4
50.2
50.1
80
Unmet need for family planning (%) n/a
26.5
24.6
-
27
15
 
Sources:
MoH (1992).
MoH, New Era & Macro International Inc. (2001).
MoHP, New Era, & Macro International Inc. (2006).
MoHP, New Era, & ICF International (2011).
MoHP (2010).
DoHS (2010).
DoHS (2011).

Note: The data collected by the mid-term survey in 2010 on contraception prevalence and the unmet need for family planning was not taken into account as that survey was conducted only in rural Nepal and its results cannot be generalised to the nation as a whole.

 

Priorities until 2015

Progress thus far suggests that Nepal’s child and maternal health-related MDGs are achievable. The real challenge is to scale up what works, continually improve effectiveness and accelerate progress. There is also a need to better target the hardest to reach segment of the popula-tion, those who have been overlooked in the past. This group includes, the ultra-poor and those disadvantaged because of their sex, age, ethnicity, disability, or geo-graphical location.

New targets for major child and maternal health indicators should be established and  some  altogether  new  indicators added.  In addition, since achievements are currently not uniform across either population groups or ecological or devel-opment regions, these targets should disaggregated.  

Maternal health

  • Set new targets for the MMR, the pro -portion of births attended by SBAs, CPR, and the adolescent birth rate.
  • Add several new indicators, includ -ing the rate of unmet need for family planning among couples currently living together, the proportion of deliveries in health facilities, the percentage of ever-married women aged 15-49 with a low body mass index (BMI<18.5), and total fertility rate.
  • Establish disaggregated targets that take into account the current disparities across demographic and geographical groups.

1.09 years
remaining
until 2015

1990 2015
Targets for MDG 5
  1. Reduce by three quarters the maternal mortality ratio
    • Most maternal deaths could be avoided
    • Giving birth is especially risky in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where most women deliver without skilled care
    • The rural-urban gap in skilled care during childbirth has narrowed
  2. Achieve universal access to reproductive health & inadequate funding for family planning is a major failure in fulfilling commitments to improving women’s reproductive health
    • More women are receiving antenatal care
    • Inequalities in care during pregnancy are striking
    • Only one in three rural women in developing regions receive the recommended care during pregnancy
    • Progress has stalled in reducing the number of teenage pregnancies, putting more young mothers at risk
    • Poverty and lack of education perpetuate high adolescent birth rates
    • Progress in expanding the use of contraceptives by women has slowed & use of contraception is lowest among the poorest women and those with no education